WHAT IS A CONVENTIONAL SEPTIC SYSTEM?

A septic system is designed to be either conventional, without air added to the liquid, or aerobic, with air added to the liquid.

A septic system is comprised of three parts.

The tank is the first part.

The disposal field is the second part.

The soil is the third part.

The purpose of the three parts is simple and easy to understand.

First, the purpose of the tank is to remove most of the solid waste from the water.

Conventional septic tanks, without air added to the liquid, simply store the solid waste until you remove the solid waste by pumping the tank.
Picture of inlet chamber without the Pirana. Build up of scum solids are previlant (undisturbed). Picture of inlet chamber without the Pirana. Build up of scum solids are previlant.
Aerobic tanks, with air added to the liquid, grow oxygen breathing bacteria that remove solid waste by digesting it.
Second, the purpose of the disposal field is to spread the liquid from the tank over a large underground area of soil, so the liquid can be absorbed or soaked up by the soil.

Third, the purpose of the soil is to do the final treatment or purify the liquid from the tank.

Large numbers of tiny life forms called microbes live in the soil.

These microbes eat the remaining waste in the liquid.

This purifies the liquid so it is safe for humans and will not pollute drinking water or the environment.


For in depth information, see a detailed information page .


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